Ensign George West

George West, son of Levi West and Mary Unknown, was born on 27 Aug 1749 in MD.1,2,3

George West sold land to a Baptist Church between Apr 1773 and May 1775 in Old Dobbs County, NC. (see Book 10, page 512.)

George West married Mary Ann Dillahunty, daughter of Reverend John Dillahunty and Hannah Neal, on 1 Jul 1773 in Dobbs County, NC.  (She also states they were married 7 Jan 1773). 1,4

George and Mary became the parents of Anna West assumedly in Dobbs County, NC.1,2

George and Mary became the parents of Sally West on 6 Feb 1779 assumedly in Dobbs County, NC.1,2

George West sold land to Charles Markland between Apr 1779 and Apr 1784 in Old Dobbs County, NC. ( see Book 12, page 289)

During the Revolutionary War, George West was enlisted with the 41st Infantry in Jan 1781. He was a private and an ensign.

A letter of recommendation in his pension file states:

New York Jun 6, 1814

Sir,

Ensign George West of the forty first Regiment of Infantry has expressed to me a desire to be transferred to the Artillery in which he is informed are sundry vacancies for the second and third Lieutenants.

Mr. West serve in the state prison guard previously to his appointment in the army and acquainted himself in the former with reputation and I believe is well esteemed in his present station. If there the organization of the Artillery should furnish an opportunity to gratify his wishes, I beg leave to recommend his transfer and am persuaded he will make a reputable and valuable officer.

I am respectfully Sir

Your ???

Daniel D. Tompkins

Another reads:

Honorable John Armstrong

I have taken the liberty of covering a number of Letters on behalf of Ensign George West, recommending his promotion. I think he bids ? to make a good Officer and appears to have many Friends. ~~ Should your good self approve of his promotion you will confer a favor on,

Your Most Obedient and obliged

Humble Servant

Nathel G. Ingraham

New York

June 1814

Another reads:

New York 6th Jun 1814

The Hon. The Secty of War,

Sir,

The undersigned asks liberty to recommend to the notice of the Hon: the Secy of War, Ensign George West of the 41st US Iny. Mr. West is desirous of a transfer to the Corps of Artillery as Lieut. From his information in military science, activity, enterprise of industry, united with sobriety of a gentlemanly deportment much may be expected. The undersigned from his acquaintance with Mr. W, ? confidence in his abilities and deems him worthy of notice and hopes that his application may meet with one regard.

With sentiments of respect and consideration

I am Sir your most obt servt.

Samuel Akerly.4

George and Mary became the parents of Micajah West assumedly in Dobbs County, VA.1,2

George and Mary became the parents of Hannah West on 30 Mar 1784 assumedly in Dobbs County, NC. She’s 26-45 on the 1820 census.1,2,5

George West received a land grant.  His land was entered 21 Sep 1785 in Dobbs County, NC The following is a transcription of that land grant:

State of North Carolina

No. 731 Know ye that we have granted unto George West one hundred and twenty five acres of land in Dobbs County on the Vine Swamp joining Nunz, Lowry’s and John Dillihaunty’s line. Beginning at a state in or near John Dillahunty’s and runs West one hundred and forty poles to a pine Lowry’s Corner then North with Brown’s line forty eight poles to Nunns line then west with Nunns Line North eight degrees East ninety poles to his corner then with his other line North two degrees East one hundred poles to a small red oak in Nunn’s line in Chances Savannah then forth twenty four degrees East eighty poles to a pine then forth thirty six degrees East thirty eight poles to a black Jack John Dillahunty’s Corner then with his line to the Beginning. To Hold unto the said George West his Heirs and assigns forever. Dated the Twenty First day of September 1785.

George and Mary became the parents of Asa H. West on 13 Oct 1786 assumedly in Dobbs County, NC.1,2

George West sold land to Joshua Nunn between Apr 1789 and Apr 1792 in Old Dobbs County, NC. (see Book 14, page 375.)

George and Mary became the parents of Logan D. West.1,2

While it is possible that George West was living in NC in 1790, I have not found him yet. (Not listed in Dobbs County, NC, need to check Wayne County, NC).

In 1779, Wayne County was formed from the western half of Dobbs County. Twelve years later, in 1791, the remainder of Dobbs County was divided into Lenoir and Glasgow (Greene after 1799), and Dobbs County thus ceased to exist. The early records of Dobbs County were destroyed when the Lenoir County Court House was burned in 1878.

George and Mary became the parents of Rachel J. West on 21 Jul 1792.1,2

George and Mary became the parents of Polly W. West on 10 Aug 1795.1,2

George and Mary became the parents of Anda N. West on 22 Apr 1797.1,2

George and Mary became the parents of Elizabeth M. “Betsey M.” West on 27 Oct 1801.1,2

Beginning on 07 August 1820, the 1820 census enumeration was the first to ask about naturalization status. George West was listed as the head of a family on the 1820 census of Rutherford County, TN. Based on ages, it is possible that the following were also living in the household:, Mary Ann Dillahunty, a free white female, over forty-five years of age.6

George West was listed as the head of a family on the 1830 census in 1830 of Rutherford County, TN. Based on ages, it is possible that the following were also living in the household:, Mary Ann Dillahunty, a free white female age seventy to eighty years old. Not sure who the other woman living with him is right now. He owned 7 slaves.7

George West wrote his will on 20 May 1835 in Rutherford County, TN. Rachel West, Mary Ann West, Polly Mooney, Hannah Estes, George West, Anna West, Alfred West, Simpson West, George West, Pheby West, Elizabeth West, Anna Vollen, Anna Trail, Sarah Springer, Andrew West, Mary Ann West, Thomas West, Hannah Roberts, Rachel Cooper, Polly McCrory, Elizabeth M. Potts and Logan D. West were listed as an heir.8  The following is a transcription of that will:

In the name of God amen, I George West of Rutherford County and State of Tennessee being of sound mind and memory do make this my will in form as follows to my wish is that all my lawful debts be paid after that I dispose of the balance of my estate in the following manner. Item the 1st I will that my beloved wife Mary Ann West have the land and plantations whereon I now live and all the appurtenances there unto belonging for her own proper use and benefit during her life and also one horse beast whichever she may chose of out of any belonging to me at my death, two cows and calves two feather beds and furniture and steads and as many hogs and sheep as she may think fit to keep for her use and as much house hold and kitchen furniture besides What is named above as she may think proper to keep for her use and benefit and the farming utenseals (sic) and also all the slaves, the whole of which she is to keep during her life and to use the same for her benefit and also all the ready money that I may have on hand. Item the 2nd the property and tract of land that formally belonged to my son Logan West which I now hold by a deed of Trust my wish is that the whole of it both land and other property be equally divided between his five children namely Polly Mooney formally Polly West, Hannah Estes formally Hannah West, George West, Anna West and Pheby West. The tract of land where on I now live my which is that at the death of my wife the same be sold by my Executor on a credit of twelve months and the proceeds to be then equally divided between my son Andrew West five children, namely Rachel, Alfred, Elizabeth Simpson, and Levi West also all the personal property that remains after my wife takes her part out my wish is that the whole of it be sold on twelve months credit and as to what is in her hands at her death then remaining and the proceeds there of to be distributed as follows my daughter Anna Vollen to have one third part of it and the balance to be equally divided between my sons Andrew West five children and Asa West five children namely Anna Trail formerly Anna West, Sarah Springer formerly Sarah West, Andrew West, Mary Ann West and Thomas West and Andrew West as hereto for named also my wish is that all my slaves that I now hold and there (sic) Increase at the death of my wife be equally divided between my four daughters to wit Hannah Roberts formerly Hannah West, Rachel Cooper formerly Rachel West, Polly W. McCrory formerly Polly W. West, Elizabeth M. Potts formerly Elizabeth M. West to them and their heirs of their body forever to possess and peaceable enjoy I also constitute and appoint William Vinson sole Executor to this my last will and testament. In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal the 20th day of May in the year of our Lord 1835..8

George West was last paid his military pension 4th quarter 1837.

George West died on 17 May 1837 in Rutherford County, TN.4,1,2

George West has died and Mary Ann Dillahunty, his widow has applied for a military pension due to his war service on 13 Mar 1838 in Rutherford County, TN. The following is a transcription of a declaration made by Mary Ann West.

Declaration
The order to obtain the benefit of the third section of the act of Congress of the 4th of July, 1836.
State of Tennessee
Rutherford County
     On the 13th day of March, 1838, personally appeared before us Richard Phillips and Lawrence C. Thompson, two of the preceding Justices of this county Court of said county of Rutherford, Mary Anne West, a resident of said county and State, aged about eighty years, who, being duly sworn according to law, doth on her oath, make the following declaration, in order to obtain the benefit of the provision made by the act of Congress, passed July 4th 1836: That she is the widow of George West deceased, who was a private and ensign in the army of the Revolution, and whose services are particularly set forth in the Declaration made some years ago by the said George West, and now on file in the Pension office at Washington, to which she refers. That her husband, the said George West, was placed on the Pension roll at the rate of one hundred seventy three dollars 33 Cents per annum, under the act of 7th June 1832, and received his pension at Nashville in this state, up to 4 March 1837–previous to his Death:
     She further declares that she was married to the said George West on the first day of July in the year, one thousand and seven hundred and seventy three, in Dobbs County, state of North Carolina, that her husband the aforesaid George West, Died in said County of Rutherford on the 17th Day of May 1837 and that she has remained a widow ever since that period, as will ? ? by reference to the proof hereto ?.
     She further state that she knows of no person who is now alive that was present when she and Mr. West were married.  It has been so long ago, she believe they are all dead.
    Mary Ann <her mark> West
State of Tennessee
Rutherford County
     On this 13th day of March 1838, Also personally appeared before us, Beceley Esquire, of said county, aged sixty years, who being duly sworn, under oath, That he was well acquainted with George West late of said County, a Pensioner of the United States, and his wife Mary Ann West, in the state of North Carolina- He was raised in the same neighborhood where they lived, and knew them as man and wife, as long ago as he can remember. He has known them for upwards of thirty years in this state, as ? ? oldest children he believes are a few years older than himself.
     Given under my hand the day and date last above written.
Soloman Busley.

State of Tennessee
Rutherford County
     This day also personally appeared before us, William Vinson, Benjamin C. Ransom, Overton McCrockett, and Dennis Holder all of said county, who being duly sworn according to law, depose and ? as follow.
     The said William Vinson, that he has been acquainted with the said George West and Mary Ann West, his wife, since the year 1809- he has  known then for the most of the time since, as man and wife.
     The said Benjamin C. Ransom and Dennis Holder, That they have known the said George West and Mary Ann West, for about twenty five years, as a man and wife, to the day of Mr. West’s death, which took place in the early part of last summer, or the latter part of the spring- And the said Overton W. Crockett, That he has became well acquainted with them as man and wife, up to Mr. West’s death, for the last eighteen years- They all state that Mrs. West has remained a widow since the death of her husband.
     William Vinsion
     V. M Crockett
     Dennis Holden
     B. C. Ransom

Hannah Robert applied for an increase in her father’s pension due to his war service on 5 Jun 1853 in Rutherford County, TN.

    State of Tennessee
    Rutherford County

     Personally appeared before us, Mrs. Hannah Roberts, formally Hannah West, who being sworn according to law, sates that she is a daughter of George West and Mary Ann West, and that she always understood and believes that her father and mother were married in North Carolina on the first day of July 1773, which is according to the family record in the family Bible, which is now before her.  Her mother has remained a widow since the death of her father.
     Hannah <her mark> Roberts

On 17 May 1839, Mary Ann West received a pension for George West, dec’d. 
     The following is a transcription of a letter signed by Hannah Roberts.
     
State of Tennessee
     County of Rutherford

     On the 5th day of June AD 1853, personally appeared before me E. H. White a Justice of the Peace within and for the County and State aforesaid Hannah Roberts who being duly sworn according to Law Declares that she is the child and heir of Ensign George West who was a soldier in the Revolutionary War and received a pension of $173.33 per annum and died on the 9th day of May 1837 and that she is informed and alive that she as the heir of the said George West- she is entitled to an increase of the said pension and that she hereby constitutes and appoints J. H. G McCutchen Attorney to examine said claim on file in the Pension Office and to do all acts that may be necessary to secure the allowance of the claims.
    Hannah <her mark>Roberts
     Given to and Subscribed before me the day and year above written.
     E. H. White
for Rutherford County Tennessee

Endnotes

1. Janella Barrett gave information to Carolyn Smotherman. Original held by Carolyn Smotherman,  Hereinafter cited as Janella Barrett, Letter: George West, Pension, #1542.

2. Carolyn Smotherman  (address withheld) gave information to Teresa Ghee Elliott. Original held by Teresa Elliott, (address withheld). This is part of George West’s Pension file. It is a compilation of all the records in the file. Hereinafter cited as Carolyn Smotherman, Letter: George West, Pension, #1545.

3. George West household, Rutherford County, TN, Page 188. 1820 Federal Population Census. Viewed online 19 Dec 2015 at http://www.ancestryheritagequest.com. Microfilmed copy of original record can be found in Giles, Maury, Rutherford, Shelby, Stewart, and Sumner Counties, TN, (National Archives Microfilm M33, Roll No. 124), National Archives, Washington, D. C. Estimated date(s) of birth: He was 45+. Hereinafter cited as 1810 Rutherford Co., TN-George West: # 3860.

4. George West Pension File; unknown file number; Pension Application. Original copy can be found in Carolyn Smotherman, (address withheld).  Hereinafter cited as “George West, Pension File”. George West, Pension:#1543.

5. Thomas Nash household, Rutherford County, TN, Page 114. 1820 Federal Population Census. Microfilmed copy of original record can be found in Giles, Maury, Rutherford, Shelby, Stewart, and Sumner Counties, TN, (National Archives Microfilm M33, Roll No. 124), National Archives, Washington, D. C. Estimated date(s) of birth: She’s 26-45.. Hereinafter cited as 1820 Rutherford Co., TN-Thomas Nash: #2292.

6. 1810 Rutherford Co., TN-George West: # 3860.

7. George West household, Rutherford County, TN, Page 322. 1830 Federal Population Census. Viewed online 19 Dec 2015 at http://www.ancestryheritagequest.com. Microfilmed copy of original record can be found in Montgomery, Madison, McNairy, Obion, Overton, Perry, Rutherford, and Robertson Counties, TN, (National Archives Microfilm M19, Roll No. 179), National Archives, Washington, D. C. Photocopy in possession of author. Hereinafter cited as 1830 Rutherford Co., TN-George West: #3851.

8. George West: will (20 May 1835). Rutherford County, TN Record Book 10, Page 1-2. Microfilmed copy of original record can be found in Rutherford County, TN, County Court Record Books 8-10 1830-1840, Roll 260, Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville TN, Family History Library Film 380488. Photocopy in possession of author. Hereinafter cited as George West, Will: George West, Pension, #1544.

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Bradley Gambill (with revised information)

 

gambill Knob

View from Gambill Cemetery in Rutherford County, TN

Bradley Gambill was born circa 1751.1

Bradley Gambill married Susanna UNKNOWN.

Bradley and Susanna became the parents of Elizabeth Gambill.

Bradley and Susanna became the parents of Lydia Gambill in 1772.3,4

Bradley Gambill received land by a land grant on 26 Sep 1772 in SC. He received 150 acres on the Granville River in South Carolina from King George III of England5

Bradley and Susanna became the parents of John Gambill on 22 Dec 1774. In 1792, John served in the Militia of the Territory of the United States South of the River Ohio. Men 18-45 served in militia units, so I believe John was 18 in 1792, making him born in 1774.6,7,4,3,8

Bradley and Susanna became the parents of James H. Gambill before 1775 assumedly in SC.

In 1772, settlers living south of the Holston River, on the Watauga and Nolichucky Rivers, within the boundaries of the North Carolina colony, organized the Watauga Association, giving America its first written constitution.2   In 1775, the Wataugans changed their name to “Washington District.” The main settlements in the Washington District were Watauga, Carter’s Valley, and Nolichucky.2

Bradley Gambill received land by a land grant from North Carolina on 19 Nov 1775 on the banks of Boone’s Creek located in Washington District, NC. It was part of the land considered the Watauga Purchase9 The following is a transcription of that land grant:

Bradley Gambal on the 19th day of November Anno Dom obtained a patent from this office for a tract of land lying on Boone’s creek bounded as follows to wit beginning at a white oak corner to William Bean line Thence No 54 degrees W 166 poles to a post oak near the creek thence 36 degrees E 34 poles to a white oak thence N 54 degrees W 80 poles to a white oak and red oak to a bridge thence S 46 degrees W 266 poles to a buckeye in a branch thence south 50 degrees E 240 poles to a post oak, thence N 47 degrees 254 poles to the beginning containing 380 acres more or less which tract was entered by William Bean the third day of May 1775 who obtained a warrent [sic]for the surveying the same a plat of which was returned to this office by the hands of Wm. Bailey Smith Surveyor.

During the Revolutionary War, Bradley Gambill was enlisted with the Continental Service. He served in VA and NC. According to the Draper Manuscripts, Bradley is listed on the payroll of Captain Joseph Martin, stationed at Fort Patrick Henry for the year 1776. Captain Martin was responsible for keeping the Indians pacified and was responsible for enabling the frontiersmen to give General Cornwallis a blow at Kings Mountain.

Though Bradley most likely served at Kings Mountain, he was in the Virginia Militia and in order to qualify for a Military Land grant in Virginia a soldier or sailor had to serve at least three (3) years continuously in the State or Continental Line or State Navy. Militia service did not count. This explains why Bradley did not have Military Land Grants.1

Bradley Gambill lived in Watauga Settlement, NC, 1776 when it was attacked by Indians. The Cherokee launched an attack against the Watauga settlements in 1776, but the Wataugans retreated to their fort and withstood the siege.

Bradley and Susanna became the parents of Jordan Gambill assumedly in NC.

Bradley and Susanna became the parents of Aaron Gambill in 1776 assumedly in Washington District, NC.4

Bradley lived in Washington District, NC. In 1777, parts of Washington District, NC became Washington County, NC. He and his family probably did not move. After that date, he would have been living in Washington County, NC. Included in the boundaries of the new county is most of present-day Tennessee.2

Bradley and Susanna became the parents of Rhoda Gambill in 1777 assumedly in Washington County, NC.4

Bradley and Susanna became the parents of Benjamin Gambill on 4 Sep 1781 in Washington County, NC.4,10,11

Bradley lived in Washington County, NC. In 1783, parts of Washington County, NC became Davidson County, TN. He and his family probably did not move. After that date, he would have been living in Davidson County, TN. Davidson County, TN was created by an act of the North Carolina Legislature in 1783. It was named in honor of William Lee Davidson. Davidson was killed in battle at Cowans Ford on the Catawba River in North Carolina.12

Bradley Gambill purchased land under the land Act of 1777. Under this act, land was only available in Johnson, Washington, Sullivan, Carter and Unicoi and the eastern parts of Hancock and Greene Counties in present day East Tennessee. Land cost 50 shillings per hundred acres. Settlers were expected to improve the property. His land was entered 13 Oct 1783 in Washington County, NC13 The following is a transcription of that land grant:

State of North Carolina

No. 405 Know ye, that We, have granted unto Bradley Gambell Two hundred acres of land in Washington County on Boones Creek Beginning at a stake on the south side of said creek and stump corner to Thomas Hardeman’s and thence South fifty four East one hundred and thirty four poles to a stake in said Hardeman’s line and thence south forty four West one hundred and forty four poles to a stake in John Hill’s line and thence north fifty four West two hundred and fifteen poles to a white oak in John Hill’s line and thence North thirty nine East one hundred and forty eight poles to a white oak corner to Thomas Hardeman’s and thence South fifty four East on said Hardeman’s line eight eight poles crossing the creek to a white oak and thence south thirty six West thirty four poles to the place of beginning. To hold unto the said Bradley Gimbell his heirs and assigns forever. dated the thirteenth day of October 1783

Alex Martin

Bradley and Susanna became the parents of Mary “Polly” Gambill assumedly in NC.

“The Territory South of the River Ohio, more commonly known as the Southwest Territory, was an organized incorporated territory of the United States that existed from May 26, 1790, until June 1, 1796; when it was admitted to the United States as the State of Tennessee. The Southwest Territory was created by the Southwest Ordinance (enacted on May 26, 1790), from lands of the Washington District that had been ceded to the U.S. federal government by the State of North Carolina. The land had been claimed by North Carolina but had not been well settled–in part due to the Royal Proclamation Act.” ~http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southwest_Territory between 26 May 1790 and 1 Jun 1796.

Bradley and Susanna became the parents of Susanna Gambill in 1790 located in the Territory of the United States Southwest of the River Ohio (present day Tennessee).14,4

An unknown person sold land to Bradley Gambill on 4 Jul 1790 in Davidson County, located in the Territory Southwest of the River Ohio (present day Tennessee). He bought 300 acres on Mill Creek.5

Article I, section 2, of the U.S. Constitution requires that a decennial population census, a nationwide enumeration or count of the population, be taken every 10 years. The first census was taken in 1790. While Bradley Gambill was probably living in Davidson County, located in the Territory Southwest of the River Ohio (present day Tennessee), the census roll is no longer in existence.

In 1782, North Carolina set off land in the Cumberland River Valley of present day upper Middle Tennessee for a military reservation. The lands in this reservation had been purchased from the Cherokee in 1775 by the Transylvania Land Company. North Carolina gave Richard Henderson 200,000 acres of land in the Powell River Valley in exchange for the land in this military reservation. North Carolina gave her soldiers who had served in the Continental Line Military Warrants redeemable in this area of present day Tennessee. George Grantson received a military warrant and sold it to Bradley Gambill on 10 Dec 1790 on Barton’s Creek, in Davidson County, located in the Territory of the United States Southwest of the River Ohio (present day Tennessee). He purchased the grant from George’s heirs15,16 The following is a transcription of that land grant:

State of North Carolina

No 1350

Know ye, that we have granted unto Bradley Gamble assignee of George Granston six hundred and forty acres of land in the County of Davidson on the waters of Bartons Creek beginning at a Hackberry and Black oak about Eighty poles north of the thirty male tree being Jacob Castlemans corner then south with Castleman’s line three hundred and twenty poles to an Elm and Walnut, thence East three hundred and twenty poles to a white ash thence North three hundred and twenty poles to an Elm thence West to the beginning To hold to the said Bradly Gamble his heirs and assigns for ever dated 10 Dec 1790

Alex Martin

In 1782, North Carolina set off land in the Cumberland River Valley of present day upper Middle Tennessee for a military reservation. The lands in this reservation had been purchased from the Cherokee in 1775 by the Transylvania Land Company. North Carolina gave Richard Henderson 200,000 acres of land in the Powell River Valley in exchange for the land in this military reservation. North Carolina gave her soldiers who had served in the Continental Line Military Warrants redeemable in this area of present day Tennessee. Martin Armstrong received a military warrant and sold it to Bradley Gambill on 10 Dec 1790 on Mill Creek, in Davidson County, located in the Territory of the United States Southwest of the River Ohio (present day Tennessee). Barton’s Creek is in present day Wilson County, TN near Lebanon17,18 The following is a transcription of that land grant:

No. 1242. Know ye that we have granted unto Bradley Gambill assigned of Martin Armstrong Sixty four acres of land in the County of Davidson, lying on Mill Creek Beginning at a Sugar tree, being the North West corner of George Nevill’s [illegible] right, then West with John Buchannan line forty poles to Thomas Hardens East boundary line, then south with said line to his former White oak seventy six poles, thence West forty nin poles to a Dogwood being James Mincer’s corner thence south with said Mincer’s line Eighty one poles to a White Oak being David Gowan’s former thence East Eighty nine poles crossing Mill Creek to a Hickory [illegible] said Gowan’s line Intersects said Nevill’s line, thence North to the beginning. To hold to the said Bradley Gambill his heirs and assigns forever dated 10th Dec 1790.

Alex Martin.

In 1782, North Carolina set off land in the Cumberland River Valley of present day upper Middle Tennessee for a military reservation. The lands in this reservation had been purchased from the Cherokee in 1775 by the Transylvania Land Company. North Carolina gave Richard Henderson 200,000 acres of land in the Powell River Valley in exchange for the land in this military reservation. North Carolina gave her soldiers who had served in the Continental Line Military Warrants redeemable in this area of present day Tennessee. Jacob Jones received a military warrant and sold it to Bradley Gambill on 10 Dec 1790 on Barton’s Creek, in Sumner County, located in the Territory of the United States Southwest of the River Ohio (present day Tennessee)19,20 The following is a transcription of that land grant:

State of North Carolina

No 1273

Know ye, that we, have granted unto Bradly Gambill assignee of Jacob Jones six hundred and forty acres of land in the county of Sumner. On the Waters of Barton’s Creek, beginning at an Elm being the South West corner of a survey of Bradley Gambill which includes the thirty mile tree then West with Jacob Casselson [ name is hard to read] line three hundred and twenty poles to a Dogwood, thence South three hundred and twenty poles to an oak thence East three hundred and twenty poles to a Hickory thence north to the beginning. To hold to the said Bradley Gambill his heirs and assigns forever dated 10 Dec 1790.

Alex Martin

Bradley and Susanna became the parents of Milton Gambill in 1792 located in the Territory of the United States Southwest of the River Ohio (present day Tennessee).

The Congress also enacted a basic militia law on May 8, 1792 (1 Stat. 271), that called for the enrollment of “every able-bodied white male citizen between the ages of 18 and 45.” The law further directed that each citizen enrolled provide himself with a “good musket, or firelock, and a sufficient bayonet and belt.” Bradley Gambill served in 1794 located in the Territory of the United States Southwest of the River Ohio (present day Tennessee). He was a member of Anderson’s Co., Isaac Roberts’ Reg’t Militia, Territory South of the Ohio.21

The Congress also enacted a basic militia law on May 8, 1792 (1 Stat. 271), that called for the enrollment of “every able-bodied white male citizen between the ages of 18 and 45.” The law further directed that each citizen enrolled provide himself with a “good musket, or firelock, and a sufficient bayonet and belt.” Bradley Gambill served between 1 Aug 1794 and 31 Aug 1794 located in the Territory of the United States Southwest of the River Ohio (present day Tennessee). Bradley Gambril appears with the rank of Pvt on a Pay Roll of a detachment of troops in the service of the United States, at or from the Davidson County Militia, Territory South of the Ohio, under the command of George McLean for Aug, 1794. Roll dated Knoxville, July 23, 1795. Commencement of service or of this settlement, Aug 1, 1794. Expiration of service or of this settlement Aug 31, 1794.

Term of service 1 month, ___days. Pay per month, 3 dollars. Amount of pay, 3 dollars, ____cents.21

The Congress also enacted a basic militia law on May 8, 1792 (1 Stat. 271), that called for the enrollment of “every able-bodied white male citizen between the ages of 18 and 45.” The law further directed that each citizen enrolled provide himself with a “good musket, or firelock, and a sufficient bayonet and belt.” Bradley Gambill served between 1 Sep 1794 and 30 Sep 1794 located in the Territory of the United States Southwest of the River Ohio (present day Tennessee). Bradley Gambril appears with the rank of Pvt on a Pay Roll of a detachment of troops in the service of the United States, at or from the Davidson County Militia, Territory South of the Ohio, under the command of Stephen Byrn for Sep, 1794. Roll dated Knoxville

July 24, 1795. Commencement of service or of this settlement, Sep 1, 1794. Expiration of service or of this settlement Sep 30, 1794.

Term of service 1 month, ___days. Pay per month, _3_dollars. Amount of pay, 3 dollars, ____cents.21

Bradley Gambill was promoted from Private to Sergeant on 1 Nov 1794 located in the Territory of the United States Southwest of the River Ohio (present day Tennessee).21

The Congress also enacted a basic militia law on May 8, 1792 (1 Stat. 271), that called for the enrollment of “every able-bodied white male citizen between the ages of 18 and 45.” The law further directed that each citizen enrolled provide himself with a “good musket, or firelock, and a sufficient bayonet and belt.” Bradley Gambill served between 1 Nov 1794 and 30 Nov 1794 located in the Territory of the United States Southwest of the River Ohio (present day Tennessee). Bradley Gambril appears with the rank of Sgt on a Pay Roll of a detachment of troops in the service of the United States, at or from the Davidson County Militia, Territory South of the Ohio, under the command of Stephen Byrn for Nov, 1794.Roll dated Knoxville

July29 1795. Commencement of service or of this settlement, Nov 1, 1794. Expiration of service or of this settlement Nov 30, 1794.

Term of service 1 month, ___days. Pay per month, _6 dollars. Amount of pay, 6 dollars, ____cents.21

Bradley and Susanna became the parents of Ann Gambill on 24 Dec 1796 in TN.22,4,23,24

Bradley Gambill paid the surety for the wedding of Sarah Kimbro and John Gambill on 1 Nov 1798 in Davidson County, TN.25,3,7

Article I, section 2, of the U.S. Constitution requires that a decennial population census, a nationwide enumeration or count of the population, be taken every 10 years. The 1800 schedules furnish only the names of the free heads of family, not of other family members. These schedules totaled the number of other family members, without name, by free or slave status. While Bradley Gambill was probably living of Davidson County, TN, the census roll is no longer in existence.

Bradley and Susanna became the parents of Bradley Kimbro Gambill on 14 Jan 1800 in Nashville, Davidson County, TN.4

Bradley and Susanna became the parents of Hiram H. Gambill in 1801 assumedly in TN.4

Bradley Gambill sold land to John Gambill on 24 Sep 1804 on the banks of Stewart’s Creek located in Rutherford County, TN.26,27,28 The following is a transcription of that deed:

This Indenture made this twenty forth day of September in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and four between Bradley Gambill of Rutherford County and State of Tennessee of the one part and John Gambill of the same County and State of the other part. Witnesseth that the said Bradley Gambill for and in consideration of the sum of one hundred dollars to him in hand paid by the said John Gambill the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged hath bargained sold aliened conveyed and confirmed with the said John Gambill his heirs and assigns forever a certain tract of land containing one hundred acres Situate lying and being in the County aforesaid on the waters of Stewart’s Creek being part of the tract said Bradley Gambell now lives on begins at Aaron Gambell’s north east corner two sugar trees thence west one hundred and nineteen poles to an Ash thence north one hundred and nineteen poles to a Stake, thence South to the beginning to have and to hold the aforesaid land with all and singular the [illegible] benefits and profits, conduments [illegible], hereditaments and appurtenances of in and to the same belonging or in anywise appertaining to the only wise benefit and behoof of him the said John Gambill his heirs and assigns forever and the said Bradley Gambill for himself his heirs and his administrators and assigns covenant and agree to and with the said John Gambell, his heirs and assigns that the [illegible] and bargained premises he will warrant and forever defend against the right, title and interest of all and every person or persons whatever. In witness whereof the said Bradley Gambill has hereunto set his hand and seal this day and year above written.

Bradley [his X mark] Gambill

Bradley Gambill sold land to Aaron Gambill on 24 Sep 1804 on the banks of Stewart’s Creek located in Rutherford County, TN.29,28 The following is a transcription of that deed:

This Indenture made this twenty forth day of September in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and four, between Bradley Gambill of Rutherford County and State of Tennessee of the one part and Aaron Gambill of the same County and State of the other part. Witnesseth that the said Bradley Gambill for and in consideration of the sum of one hundred dollars to him in hand paid by the said Aaron Gambill the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged hath bargained sold aliened conveyed and confirmed with the said Aaron Gambill his heirs and assigns forever a certain tract of land containing one hundred acres Situate lying and being in the County aforesaid on the waters of Stewart’s Creek being part of the tract said Bradley Gambell now lives on begins at a Spanish Oak in the line of the original [illegible] of Bradley Gambill, thence along said line West one hundred and nineteen poles to a large White Oak, thence North one hundred and thirty five poles to an Ash, thence East one hundred and nineteen poles to two Sugar trees, thence South to the beginning to have and to hold the aforesaid land with all and singular the rights, benefits and profits, conduments, hereditaments and appurtenances of in and to the same belonging or in anywise appertaining to the only wise benefit and behoof of him the said Aaron Gambill, his heirs and assigns forever and the said Bradley Gambill for himself his heirs and his administrators and assigns covenant and agree to and with the said Aaron Gambell, his heirs and assigns that the afore recited and bargained premises he will warrant and forever defend against the right, title and interest of all and every person or persons whatever. In witness whereof the said Bradley Gambill has hereunto set his hand and seal this day and year above written.

Bradley [his X mark] Gambill

Bradley Gambill wrote his will on 19 Jun 1806 in Rutherford County, TN. Benjamin Gambill (my son), Milton Gambill (my son), James Gambill (my son), Jordan Gambill (my son), Bradley Gambill (my son), Houram Gambill (my son) and Susanna Gambill , Bradley’s ‘beloved wife” were listed as an heir.30,31 The following is a transcription of that will:

Be it known to all men by these presents that I Bradley Gambill of Rutherford County have made my last will and testament in writing date of June the nineteenth one thousand eight hundred and six. I the said Bradley Gambill by these presents do confirm my last will and testament and do further give and bequeath to my son Benjamin Gambil a certain tract of land lying on Cainy fork in Smith County containing three hundred and twenty acres if note worth two hundred dollars for the executors to make it up that sum out of my property that can be convenient [sic]spared and I give and bequeath to my son Melton two hundred dollars a hourse brute to the value of sixty dollars I give and bequeath to my son James two town Lots in Jefferson if not worth two hundred dollars for the executors to make it up to him out of some of the other property and a sixty dollar horse I give and bequeath to my son Jordan if he should marry two hundred dollars if not at his mother’s death to have an equal share with all my children To my beloved wife I lend the plantation where I now live and Possession during her natural life at her death for the two hundred acres of land that I now live on to be equally divided between my two youngest sons Bradley and Houram, I leave it in my wife power as my daughters marries for her to give them as much household furniture and property as I give my others that married in my lifetime. I leave Executory my estate my son Benjamin Gambill and Joseph Morton my things herein mentioned and contained be faithful and surely perform in every respect that I have set my hand my last will and testament which my hand this nineteenth day of Jun 1806.

Bradley Gambill

Wit. Bird Nance

William Nance.

Bradley Gambill died between 19 Jun 1806 and 8 Mar 1807 in Rutherford County, TN. He is said to have been killed by Indians.32,33,7,4,5

Bradley Gambill was buried assumedly in John Gambill Cemetery, Rutherford County, TN. When we visited the John Gambill Cemetery in October 2015, we found the graves of John and his two wives, Hannah and Sarah. We also found at least one other marked grave, with a head stone and foot stone, but no names. Bradley Gambill may have been buried in this same cemetery and this could be his grave. It is known his son John purchased land from his father before he died and his brother Aaron’s part after his father’s death. This cemetery overlooks the valley around a knob that most likely would have been near the homestead of the original farm. This would have been a perfect spot to have built a home.

The Executor or Administrator’s first job after receiving Letters of Administration is to take an inventory or appraisal of the estate’s assets. This inventory must be filed with the court. Benjamin Gambill and Joseph Morton served as the Administrator of Bradley’s estate and filed an inventory with the court 5 Mar 1807 in Rutherford County, TN34 The following is a transcription of that inventory:

Two head of horses, thirty four head of cattle, forty head of hogs, sixteen head of sheep, one still and fencing, four beds and furniture and household furniture as much as is common on Two tedious to mention and as for corn about enough to support the family by cash two hundred dollars in notes eighty four dollars and fifty cents due to the estate [illegible] some other Little debts some farming tools of almost every description. Given power under our hands this fifth day of January Eighteen hundred and seven and [illegible]

Benjamin [his X seal]Gambill

Joseph [his X seal]Morton

March 5, 1807

James Smith and Jordan Coleman sold land on 20 Jul 1807 in Rutherford County, TN. Bradley Gambill and John Gambill were mentioned as bounding neighbors.35 The following is a transcription of that deed:

This indenture made 20 Jul 1807 between John Smith of Williamson County, and Jordan Coleman of Rutherford County for a tract of land in Rutherford County, beginning at Wm Nance’s north east corner at a sugar tree, thence south Bradley Gambell’s line 184 poles to a sugar tree, thence east 235 poles to Joseph Morton’s line and John Gambell’s corner, thence north 185 poles on the said Morton’s elm corner Isaac Nance’s line, thence west 235 poles to the beginning.

Witness: Bird Nance and Francis Coleman

Signed John Smith

Registered January Term 1808

Citations:

1. National Society of Daughters of American Revolution, Bradley Gamble Patriot Lookup Email, e-mail message from auto_reply@dar.org (http://www.dar.org/natsociety) to Teresa Elliott, Jan 2007. Hereinafter cited as Bradley Gamble, DAR Patriot Index, #2811.

2. Washington County, TN History, online http://www.rootsweb.com/~tnwashin/helps/genhelps.htm#history. Hereinafter cited as Washington Co., TN History.

3. Louise G. Brown and Jane C. Luna, The Descendants of Bradley Gambill (L.G. Brown and J.C. Luna, 1979), Page 2. Hereinafter cited as Bradley Gambill Descendants: GAMBILL (1), #1531.

4. Watauga Association of Genealogist-Upper East Tennessee, compiler, History of Washington County Tennessee 1988 (Johnson City, TN: The Association, 1988). Hereinafter cited as History of Washington County, TN: GAMBILL-Misc, #1595.

5. Bradley Gambill Descendants, Page 1.: GAMBILL (1), #1531.

6. John Gambell household, Rutherford County, TN, Page 80. 1840 Federal Population Census. Microfilmed copy of original record can be found in Overton, Rutherford, & Robertson Counties, TN, (National Archives Microfilm M704, Roll No. 533), National Archives, Washington, D. C. Estimated date(s) of birth: between 1770 and 1780. Hereinafter cited as 1840 Rutherford Co., TN-John Gambell: #2799.

7. Ruth Gillespie, Bennett-Manier, Family Group Sheets. . Photocopy is currently owned by Teresa Ghee Elliott. Hereinafter cited as Bennett-Manier Family Sheets: BENNETT-MANIER SHEET, #1428.

8. John Gambrell, Tombstone Image. Cemetery: John Gambrell Cemetery, Rutherford County, TN. Photographed by Teresa Ghee Elliott in 2015. Original in possession of author, has 22 Dec 1774-Tombstone is incredibly hard to read, but the last number appears to be a four instead of a one because of how far it is from the second seven and also it appears to be a lightly carved 4. Author has seen tombstone in person.. Hereinafter cited as John Gambrell-Tomb: Tombstone Image, #3847.

9. Bradley Gambill, Watauga Purchase, Old Deed Book A, Page 25. Written on 17 Nov 1790. Microfilmed copy of original record can be found in Davidson County, TN, Deed Books A-C 1784-1796, Roll 0001, Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville TN, Family History Library Film 332658. Photocopy in possession of author. Hereinafter cited as Bradley Gambill, Wautauga Purchase: GAMBILL-Deeds, #1636.

10. James Wilbur Vaughan, Line of Descent Chart to Bradley Gambill, Application to First Families of Tennessee, 30 Nov 1994. Address of Compiler: 204 Poplar Street, Martin, TN 38237. He states that Benjamin was born in Washington County, N. C.. Photocopy is currently owned by Teresa Ghee Elliott. Hereinafter cited as James Wilbur Vaughan, Line of Descent Chart: GAMBILL-Misc, #1729.

11. Benjm Gambill household, Bedford County, TN, Page 45. 1820 Federal Population Census. Microfilmed copy of original record can be found in Bedford, Davidson, Hardin, Hickman, Humphreys, Montgomery, Overton, Perry, Warren, Wayne, White, and Wilson Counties, TN, (National Archives Microfilm M33, Roll No. 122), National Archives, Washington, D. C. Estimated date(s) of birth: He lists himself as 26-45.. Hereinafter cited as 1820 Bedford Co., TN-Benjm Gambill: #2789.

12. Davidson County, Tennessee-Genealogy Page, online http://www.rootsweb.com/~tndavids/nashgene.htm. Hereinafter cited as Davidson Co., TN-Genweb.

13. State of North Carolina to Bradley Gambill, Land grant. Washington County, North Carolina, File Number 413; Grant Number 405; Entry 637, Book 53, Page 268. Issued on 25 Nov 1778. Filed on 13 Oct 1783. Viewed online at http://www.nclandgrants.com on 14 Oct 2015. Photocopy in possession of author. Hereinafter cited as Gambill, Land grant #405: GAMBILL (1), #1642.

14. William Polk household, Rutherford County, TN, Page 9. 1810 Federal Population Census. Microfilmed copy of original record can be found in All TN Counties lost except Rutherford County, Film not extant, National Archives, Washington, D. C. Estimated date(s) of birth: between 1784 and 1794. Hereinafter cited as 1810 Rutherford Co., TN-William Polk: #2819.

15. State of North Carolina to Bradley Gamble v. Photocopy in possession of author, State of North Carolina to Bradley Gamble: Land grant, Grant Number 1350. Microfilmed copy of original record can be found in North Carolina Land Grants, Roll 006, Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville TN. This document was previously owned by NC. Hereinafter cited as Bradley Gamble Landgrant: GAMBIL-Deeds, #1637.

16. State of North Carolina to Bradley Gambill, Land grant. Davidson County, NC, File Number1619; Grant Number 1350, Book 74, Page 382. Filed on 10 Dec 1790. Viewed online at http://www.nclandgrants.com on 14 Oct 2015. Microfilmed copy of original record can be found in North Carolina Land Grant Record Books (1693-1960) Volumes 73-75, S.108.160.138N, North Carolina Division of Library and Archives, Raleigh NC. Photocopy in possession of author. Hereinafter cited as Gambill, Land grant: GAMBILL (1), #3852.

17. State of North Carolina to Bradley Gambill, Land grant. Davidson County, NC, Grant Number 1242, Book C-3, Page 78. Written on 10 Dec 1790. Microfilmed copy of original record can be found in Davidson County, TN, Deed Books A-C 1784-1796, Roll 0001, Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville TN, Family History Library Film 332658. Photocopy in possession of author. Hereinafter cited as Bradley Gambill, Landgrant 2: GAMBILL (1), #1634.

18. State of North Carolina to Bradley Gambill, Land grant. Davidson County, NC, File Number1581; Grant Number 1242, Book 74, Page 345. Filed on 10 Dec 1790. Viewed online at http://www.nclandgrants.com on 14 Oct 2015. Microfilmed copy of original record can be found in North Carolina Land Grant Record Books (1693-1960) Volumes 73-75, S.108.160.138N, North Carolina Division of Library and Archives, Raleigh NC. Photocopy in possession of author. Hereinafter cited as Gambill, Land grant: GAMBILL (1), #3851.

19. State of North Carolina to Bradley Gambill (assignee of Jacob Jones), Landgrant. Sumner County, North Carolina, Grant Number 1273; Warrant 2460, Book C-3, Page 92-3. Written on 10 Dec 1790. Microfilmed copy of original record can be found in North Carolina Land Grants, Roll 006, Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville TN. Photocopy in possession of author. Hereinafter cited as Gambill, Land grant 1273: GAMBILL (1), #1642.

20. State of North Carolina to Bradley Gambill, Land grant. Davidson County, NC, File Number 280; Grant Number 1273, Book 74, Page 356. Issued on 14 Nov 1784. Filed on 10 Dec 1790. Viewed online at http://www.nclandgrants.com on 14 Oct 2015. Microfilmed copy of original record can be found in North Carolina Land Grant Record Books (1693-1960) Volumes 73-75, S.108.160.138N, North Carolina Division of Library and Archives, Raleigh NC. Photocopy in possession of author. Hereinafter cited as Gambill, Land grant: GAMBILL (1), #3853.

21. Bradley Gambill (Gamble and Gambrill), Compiled service records of Volunteer soldiers who served from 1784-1811 Records of the Adjutant General’s Office, 1780’s-1917, Record Group 94, National Archives, Washington, D. C., viewed online on 05 Feb 2013, accessed online at http://www.fold3.com. Compiled service records of volunteer soldiers who served from 1784-1811. The compiled service records consist of a jacket-envelope for each soldier, which typically contains card abstracts of entries relating to the soldiers as found in the original muster rolls, payrolls, receipt rolls, returns and lists. Hereinafter cited as Bradley Gambill-Compiled Service Records, #3485.

22. John Nance household, Rutherford County, TN, Page 327. 1830 Federal Population Census. Microfilmed copy of original record can be found in Montgomery, Madison, McNairy, Obion, Overton, Perry, Rutherford, and Robertson Counties, TN, (National Archives Microfilm M19, Roll No. 179), National Archives, Washington, D. C. Estimated date(s) of birth: between 1790 and 1800. Hereinafter cited as 1830 Rutherford Co., TN-John Nance: #2818.

23. Susana Gambrell household, Rutherford County, TN, Page 23. 1810 Federal Population Census. Microfilmed copy of original record can be found in Rutherford County, TN, (National Archives Microfilm M252, Roll No. 063), National Archives, Washington, D. C. Estimated date(s) of birth: between 1794 and 1800. Hereinafter cited as 1810 Rutherford Co., TN-Susana Gambrell: #2807.

24. John Nance household, Rutherford County, TN, Page 98. 1820 Federal Population Census, Giles, Maury, Rutherford, Shelby, Stewart, and Sumner Counties, TN, (National Archives Microfilm M33, Roll No. 124), National Archives, Washington, D. C. Estimated date(s) of birth: between 1794 and 1804. Hereinafter cited as 1820 Rutherford Co., TN-John Nance: #2812.

25. John Gambull and Sarah Kimbro, Marriage Record (01 Nov 1798). Davidson County, TN Book 1, Page 35. Viewed online on 30 Mar 2014 at http://www.Ancestry.com. Original copy held by Davidson County, TN, Marriage Book 1 1789-1837, Roll 0469, Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville TN, Family History Library Film 200294. Hereinafter cited as Marriage-Gambull-Kimbro, #3725.

26. Bradley Gambill to John Gambill, Deed. Rutherford County, TN, Book A, Page 34. Written on 24 Sep 1804. Microfilmed copy of original record can be found in Rutherford County, TN, Deed Books A-F, G (missing) 1804-1808, Roll 109, Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville TN. Photocopy in possession of author. Hereinafter cited as Gambill-Gambill, Deed: GAMBILL-Deeds, #1547.

27. Helen and Timothy R. Marsh, Land Deed Genealogy of Rutherford County, Tennessee 1804-1813 Volume 1, Volume 1 (Greenville, SC: Southern Historical Press, Inc, 2001), Page 7. Hereinafter cited as Rutherford Co., TN Land Deeds, #1906.

28. Don Simmons and Laura Willis, Rutherford County, TN Deeds Volume 1 1804-1808 (Melber, KY: Simmons Historical Publications, 1996), p. 10 This is just a transcription of the deed.. Viewed online at http://www.WorldVitalRecords.com. Hereinafter cited as Rutherford Deeds 1804-1808: H976.854 PAR, #3648.

29. Bradley Gambill to Aaron Gambill, Deed. Rutherford County, TN, Book A, Pgs. 34-5. Written on 24 Sep 1804. Microfilmed copy of original record can be found in Rutherford County, TN, Deed Books A-F, G (missing) 1804-1808, Roll 109, Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville TN. Photocopy in possession of author. Hereinafter cited as Bradley Gambill-Aaron Gambill, Deed: GAMBILL (1), #1541.

30. Bradley Gambill: Will and Inventory: will (19 Jun 1806). Rutherford County, TN Record Book 2, Page 21-23. Microfilmed copy of original record can be found in Rutherford County, TN, Index to Books 1-28 Index to Books 18-28 County Court Record Books 1-7 1804-1827, Roll 259, Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville TN. Photocopy in possession of author. Hereinafter cited as Bradley Gambill, Will: GAMBILL-Wills, #1635.

31. Helen C. Marsh, Wills and Inventories of Rutherford Co., Tennessee Vol 1, 1804-1829, Volume 1 (Greenville, S. C.: Southern Historical Press, Inc., 1998). Hereinafter cited as Marsh, Wills and Inventories, #1891.

32. Bradley Gamble, DAR Patriot Index, #2811.

33. James Wilbur Vaughan, Line of Descent Chart: GAMBILL-Misc, #1729.

34. Bradley Gambill: Will and Inventory: will (19 Jun 1806). Rutherford County, TN Record Book 2, Page23. Microfilmed copy of original record can be found in Rutherford County, TN, Index to Books 1-28 Index to Books 18-28 County Court Record Books 1-7 1804-1827, Roll 259, Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville TN. Photocopy in possession of author. Hereinafter cited as Bradley Gambill, Will: GAMBILL-Wills, #3841.

35. Rutherford Co., TN Land Deeds, He is mentioned as a bounding neighbor., #1906.

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When One Dies too early in a burned county…

Peter Vincent was born ca 1826 in TN and is most likely the son of Jacob and Dicey Unknown Vincent.  He married his wife Sarah probably in Bedford County, TN sometime in the early 1840s*.  They had three children:

Mary F. born circa 1845 married Burnett Victory.

George W. born 1849

Dicie born 1853.

In 1850, Sarah and Peter are shown in Bedford County, TN with their children, Mary F.  and George W.:

1850PeterVinson2

By 1860, George and Dycey are living with Jacob and Dicey Vincent. Peter, Sarah and Mary F. aren’t to be found.

Mary F. marries Burnett Victory in 1862 in Williamson County, TN.  In 1870, Dicie Vincent, age 18, is living with her and Burnett.  Jacob and Dicey are no longer found in the census.

Problem is:  *The Bedford County courthouse and many of its records were destroyed in 1861, leaving any probates that Jacob or Dicey or Peter might have left behind no longer extant.  If it weren’t for that one 1850 census enumeration and the fact that Dicey, named after her grandmother, was living with her grandparents and then later her sister, there would be nothing to create a family group here and what we do have is purely circumstantial.

I have no idea where George went after his grandparent’s death. 

So that leaves us with the exhaustive search of all the records of Bedford County, hoping for a nibble on this family.  And this week I began that process. Using Evernote and one note per roll of microfilm and a Not Found tag for Peter, I began the process of looking through each roll of microfilm.  Here is just a small sampling of the films I have used to look for Jacob and Peter:

  • B001 Bedford County, TN Circuit Court Clerk Minutes Jun 1840-Apr 1857
  • B002 Bedford County, TN Circuit Court Clerk Minute Books (Aug 1857-Aug 1859)
  • B003 Bedford County, TN Circuit Court Clerk Minute Books (Aug 1859-Aug 1860)
  • B004 Bedford County, TN Circuit Court Minute Books (Apr 1864-Aug 1867)
  • B011 Bedford County, TN Circuit Court Minute Book 10 (Civil) and Criminal Book 2 (Apr 1890-Dec 1895)
  • B012 Bedford County, TN Circuit Court Minute Book 11 (Civil) and Criminal Book 3 (Dec 1895-Apr 1902)
  • B013 Bedford County, TN Circuit Court Minute Book 12 (Civil) and Criminal Book 4 (Dec 1899-Apr 1907)
  • B014 Bedford County, TN Circuit Court Criminal Books 5-6 (Apr 1903 – Apr 1910)
  • B015 Bedford County, TN Circuit Court Minute Book 13 (Civil) and Criminal Book 7 (Apr 1907-Apr 1914)
  • B016 Bedford County, TN Circuit Court Minute Book 14-15 (Civil)  (Dec 1913-Apr 1921)
  • B017 Bedford County, TN Circuit Court Minute Book 17-18 (Civil)  (Dec 1922-Dec 1926)
  • B018 Bedford County, TN Circuit Court Minute Books 19-20 (Civil)  (Dec 1926 – Aug 1931)
  • B019 Bedford County, TN Circuit Court Minute Books 21-22 (Aug 1931-Dec 1936)
  • B020 Bedford County, TN Circuit Court Minute Books 23-24 (Dec 1936-Apr 1940)
  • B022 Bedford County, TN Circuit Court Minute Books 27-28 (Apr 1944-Dec 1949)
  • B023 Bedford County, TN Circuit Court Minute Books 29-30 (Dec 1949-Dec 1953)
  • B024 Bedford County, TN Circuit Court Minute Books 31-32 (Dec 1953-Aug 1958)
  • B025 Bedford County, TN Circuit Court Minute Books 33-34 (Aug 1958-Aug 1961)
  • B026 Bedford County, TN Circuit Court Minute Books 35-36 (Aug 1961-Apr 1965)
  • B027 Bedford County, TN Chancery Court Clerk Minute Book 1 (Aug 1836-Dec 1848)
  • B028 Bedford County, TN Chancery Court Clerk Minute Books 2-3 (Feb 1846 – Nov 1858)
  • B029 Bedford County, TN Chancery Court Minute Books 4, A (Mar 1850-Jun 1868)
  • B033 Bedford County, TN Chancery Court Clerk Minute Books H-I (Sep 1885-Mar 1895)
  • B034 Bedford County, TN Chancery Court Clerk Minute Books J-K (May 1895 – May 1901)
  • B035 Bedford County, TN Chancery Court Clerk Minute Books L-M (May 1901-Jun 1906)
  • B036 Bedford County, TN Chancery Court Clerk Minute Books N-O (Jun 1906-Mar 1911)
  • B037 Bedford County, TN Chancery Court Clerk Minute Books P-Q (Apr 1911-Aug 1915)
  • B044 Bedford County, TN Probate Records Administrators and Executors Bonds and Letters Books 1- 2 (1861-1894)
  • B045 Bedford County, TN Probate Records Administrators and Executors Bonds and Letter Books 3-4 (1894-Feb 1917)
  • B046 Bedford County, TN Probate Records Administrators and Executors Bonds and Letter Books 5-6 (Mar 1917-Mar 1936)
  • B047 Bedford County, TN Probate Records Administrators and Executors Bonds and Letter Books 7-8 (Mar 1936-Feb 1953)
  • B048 Bedford County, TN Probate Records Administrators and Executors Bonds and Letter Book 9 (Feb 1953-Apr 1960)
  • B050 Bedford County, TN Probate Records Administrator and Executor Settlements Books C-D (Nov 1885-Jan 1910)
  • B051 Bedford County, TN Probate Records Administrator and Executor Settlements Books E, 1-2 (Aug 1904-Feb 1955)
  • B052 Bedford County, TN Probate Records Administrator and Executor Settlements Book 3 (Feb 1955-Apr 1963)
  • B053 Bedford County, TN Probate Records Misc. Automobile Registrations (Jul 1910-Nov 1915)
  • B054 Bedford County, TN Probate Records Claims against Estates (Oct 1921-Dec 1923)
  • B055 Bedford County, TN Probate Records Conservators Bond Book 1 (Jun 1954-May 1965)
  • B056 Bedford County, TN Probate Records Guardian Bonds and Letters Book A-C (Nov 1869-Dec 1894)
  • B057 Bedford County, TN Probate Records Guardian Bonds and Letters Books D-E (Dec 1894 – Nov 1930)
  • B059 Bedford County, TN Probate Records Guardian Settlements Books C- D (Oct 1879-Apr 1892)
  • B079 Bedford County, TN County Court Minute Book A-B (Jan 1863-May 1869)
  • B099 Bedford County, TN Probate Records Wills and Inventories Books A-B (Sep 1863-Mar 1878)
  • B293 Bedford County, TN Chancery Court Clerk Enrollments (Jul 1848 – Sep 1851)

Once this process is complete, then I’ll need to do the same for Williamson, since we know Mary F. married there, and probably Rutherford, just because the county courthouse was so close to where this family lived. And maybe in there some place will be that one document a girl needs to prove that she is on the right track….

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So You Wanna Sort Some Pictures….

 

I am working on getting all our family photos scanned and shared on FB with my cousins and then moved to photo safe albums.  Okay, the term all is a little vague:  Let’s just say my mom is a huge fan of Rubber Made and our family photos have allowed more than one Rubber Made executive to retire on his yacht.  I wish I was exaggerating. I really do, but I digress.

Mom gave me several of these and I figured, divide and conquer, so one is in my office. The rest are weighing down the rafters in the man cave. Gotta love a man that will use Rubber Made totes of all your old school photos stacked together as a backdrop to his office.   Outta sight, however means out of mind, and I am trying to move beyond that.

So first things first:  As I have said before, I hate am not a big fan of Rubber Made or Sterilite products IF a prettier alternative is available in the same price range ball park. But alas, that is not always the case and in fact, there are some products that they do better than anyone out there, far cheaper.  Stacking plastic drawers for instance.

This morning, I bought three:  But the thing is, while they are functional and cheap, they aren’t pretty. So I decided that since I wanted to add labels with surnames anyway, why not pretty the thing up a bit?

So step one:  Find Avery Template for the labels that you have at home. (or buy labels).  I always keep different sizes on hand because I hate my handwriting, so I downloaded the template I needed. Advice:  First save the blank template for later use.  Then I searched online until I found a family tree image I liked. There are millions and I just chose one that was fairly simple.  Paste it into the first template box. I had to resize it to fit. Once you get it the size you want, copy it again and paste into each template box. 

Step two: SAVE THE TEMPLATE for future use. DO NOT SKIP this step. I speak from experience. If you get it exactly the way you want it, save the template.

Step three:  Add in a text box.  I had to do this to get my text to center on the template box where I wanted it to. I had to play with the boxes a bit to get all names basically the same size and place in the box.  Then pick a font you like and type in your surnames you have images for. I created on box for my family and another for my Mom and Dad since I have tons of pictures for both families in the boxes. The rest I did by Surname only.

Step four:  SAVE THE TEMPLATE for future use. DO NOT SKIP this step. I speak from experience. If you get it exactly the way you want it, save the template.  Yes, you have read that before. That is how important it is.

Step five:  Print labels and add to your sorting drawers.

Step six:  Begin sorting pictures by surnames. Because the drawers are small, you will have to stop from time to time and scan. This will keep both jobs from becoming overwhelming.

Now, you want to see?

image

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The Fifth District….

Sometime between 1825 and 1830, James Wharton moved to the 5th District of Davidson County, TN.  There he and his wife, Elizabeth Searles raised sixteen children.  Their daughter, Elmira Wharton married Thomas Dixon Morgan in May 1861.

Sometime between 1850 and 1860, Joseph Morgan moved his family to the 5th District of Davidson County, TN from Jackson County, TN.  There he and his wife, Nancy Williams raised eight children.  Their son, Thomas Dixon married Elmira Wharton in 1861.

For the next 100 years, the Wharton and Morgan descendants would live pretty much in the same area of the 5th District. When I was born 100 years later, my mother and father had built their dream home on land owned by my paternal grandparents in the 5th District of Davidson County.  When my parents sold their home in 1985, my family had lived in the 5th district for 155+ years!

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Senior Year… Part 3

When I started my blog back about 2008, my oldest, #1, was starting his senior year.  A year later, his sister, #2 followed. In the meantime we have lost a dog, two cats, two guinea pigs, five birds, numerous fish. Washed untold loads of laundry, cooked tons of food.  And while I wasn’t looking #3 continued to grow.  Tomorrow, she starts her senior year in High School. Oh my, where has the time gone?  This summer has been a trying one.  But in the background preparation for senior year has gone on.  We took senior pictures and they were all perfect.  We had band camp.  She was in leadership, which means she leaves home about 10:30 am, gets home around 11:00 pm.

And today was band pictures.  And tomorrow, day 1 of 180 in what will be the fastest year of my life.  Trying not to freak out about the fact that in 9 short months, she will be packing her room for college.

But I know that it will be okay. She’ll follow her siblings and head west to the same college they went to and I will hopefully start a new adventure myself.

EMPTY NEST SYNDROM.

They make medicine for that right?!?

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Loyalty and the Confederacy…..

Having grown up in the Deep South, I wasn’t all that shocked to find that 7 of my 8 Civil War ancestors fought for the South.  In fact, I was more shocked to find that my one ancestor, who supposedly also was a slave trader, fought for the North.

This past week, I have been looking for my ancestors who applied for Pensions for the War of 1812.  One thing I have noticed is they had to prove they had been loyal during the Civil War, since the Pensions were applied for in the 1870s after the war. Which got me to thinking.

Let’s assume that my War of 1812 ancestor’s father was living in what is now the US during the Revolutionary period. Many of them were. They would have been old enough to serve, and would have had to chosen which side to serve on. Were they going to remain loyal servants of the King, or were they going to be loyal to this new country they were creating?  So far, the ancestors I have found that have served, were Patriots. They chose loyalty to their new country.  Mainly I think the choice was made for them, as they were Overmountain men, and to protect their homes from the King and from the Indians that lived around them, they had to fight to protect their family. Already living outside the King’s territory meant they had pretty much already made their choice.

Then one generation later, their sons, would have served their country in the War of 1812. So far I have found relatives of my ancestors, but no directs. Found several of Hubby’s direct ancestors though. 

By 1870, most of the men who had been old enough to serve in the War of 1812, would have been dead. If their widow as still alive, she would have qualified for his pension. Found one man filing on behalf of his father’s heirs.  The ones that were still alive had to prove service, wives had to prove they had married and they had to prove they had remained loyal during the Civil War period. 

Now that leads me to my direct ancestors, many of whom served in the Confederacy.  They fought for State’s Rights  and their ability to make their own choices, and not have the Federal Government make those choices.  You know, many of the same things their grandfathers and great grandfathers had fought for during the Revolutionary War.   They felt they were being loyal to their state when Tennessee left the Union in June 1861.

Now fast forward about 18 years, and their elderly parents are applying for a pension for Dad’s war service.  And Dad has to prove he remained loyal to the United States, when three of his sons fought for the Confederacy?  These were the same men, whose father’s had rebelled against the King and were war heroes.  Now their sons had rebelled and they were possibly going to lose their pensions because of it.  It all goes down to who the victors are as to how we define loyalty…..

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